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Department of Women's and Gender Studies University of Missouri Department of Women's and Gender Studies

Next Semester Courses

Fall 2014

  • 1120.01 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
  • 1120.02 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (online)
  • 1360 The Female Experience: Body, Identity, Culture
  • 2003 Topics: Black Coupling and Families
  • 2010 Gender and Identity: Understanding Intersectionality
  • 2080 Perspectives on Sexual and Gender Diversity: Gender Freedom
  • 2250 Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class and Sexuality in the Americas: Latinas in the U.S.
  • 2340 Perspectives on Gender and Popular Culture: Women in Popular Culture (online)
  • 2400 Social History of U.S. Women
  • 2960 Sexual Health Advocacy and Service Learning
  • 3180 Historical Survey of Women Writers
  • 3260 Themes in Gender, Law and Justice (online)
  • 3300 Queer Theories/Identities
  • 3320 Sociology of Gender
  • 3450 Feminist Methodologies
  • 3480 Themes in Sexuality and Literature: Bad Girls
  • 3560 Themes in Gender and Immigration: Documenting Current Controversies in Mexican/U.S. Immigration
  • 3570 European Women in the 19th Century
  • 3850 Themes in Gender and the Politics of Representation: Feminist Media Studies
  • 3960 Strategies for Effective Peer Education
  • 4020 Studies in Feminist Thought: Black Feminist Thought
  • 4400 Contemporary Issues in Domestic Violence
  • 4550 Gender and Human Rights in Cross Cultural Perspective
  • 4780 Women's Folklore and Feminist Theory
  • 4874 Women's and Gender Studies Abroad - Buenos Aires Program
  • 4940 Internship in Women's and Gender Studies
  • 4965 Special Readings in Women's and Gender Studies
  • 7020 Studies in Feminist Thought: Black Feminist Thought
  • 7400 Contemporary Issues in Domestic Violence
  • 7550 Gender and Human Rights in Cross Cultural Perspective
  • 7780 Women's Folklore and Feminist Theory
  • 7874 Women's and Gender Studies Abroad - Buenos Aires Program
  • 8040 Seminar: Problems and Issues in Feminist Scholarship
  • 8965 Problems in Women's and Gender Studies
  • 9440 Race, Gender, Ethnicity in Higher Education

Descriptions

WGST 1120, Section 01 - Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Julie Passanante Elman
Lecture MW 11-11:50am, Discussion Sections F 9-9:50am, F 11-11:50am, F 12-12:50pm or F 3-3:50pm
Lecture: Neff Hall 204

This course examines some major strands of critical gender and sexuality and studies, relating them to and understanding them through the American cultural history of gender and sexuality. In this class, you will learn to analyze historical changes in the social organization and cultural meanings of gender, sexual practices, desires, and bodies in the United States. You will become familiar with the field of gender and sexuality studies as we examine the establishment of various sexual norms throughout history, from the 19th century to the present and from the US to the globalized world. While gaining familiarity with theories of gender and sexuality, we will analyze the contested boundaries drawn between same-sex socializing, friendship, and desire; racialized and sexualized violence; dis/ability, notions of "normal bodies," medical knowledge, and sexuality; and the emergence and historical contingence of sexual identities, such as heterosexuality and homosexuality, as prominent modes of understanding sexual experience, identity, politics, and cultural representation. Previous course title: Bodies, Cultures, and Nations.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 1120 - Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (online)
Jes Hodgson
Arranged (Online Course: Mizzou Online/Off Campus)

This class is designed to help you learn to think critically and analytically about the various ways that gender is socially constructed and how its construction has both social and cultural importance. We will pay particular attention to how race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and location structure the lived experiences that women face. In addition, we will delve into the ways in which these constructions and intersections shape women's lives. Another key area of this course's focus will be gender inequality. We will explore how women may endure similar struggles while engaging with the ways that differing social, political, economic, and cultural conditions create distinct differences among individuals.

As an interdisciplinary introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, in this class you will read and view a variety of texts: personal narratives, feminist theory, analytic essays, poems, stories, documentary films, TED lectures, and YouTube videos (to name a few). These texts will help you gain a comprehensive understanding of gender as a historical and socio-cultural construction, an introduction to concepts and issues emerging in the field of Women's and Gender Studies, and an understanding of contemporary debates taking place in feminist theory and scholarship.

As an online course, students' primary responsibilities each week will be to: read/view materials in the book (Women's Voices, Feminist Visions: Classic and Contemporary Readings, 5th edition) and online, participate in an online discussion board which focuses on the reading/viewing materials, take a reading quiz, and write personal blog posts. There will also be a midterm during week 7 and a final exam during week 15. You will be able to access all course materials online and in your textbook, and you will take all quizzes and exams on the course Blackboard site during a several-day window of opportunity to accommodate varied student locations and schedules. Previous course title: Bodies, Cultures, and Nations.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST/Sociology 1360 - The Female Experience: Body, Identity, Culture
Staff
MWF 1:00-1:50pm | Arts & Science Building 113

This course examines the ways individuals come to understand what it means to be a woman in U.S. culture. We explore the diversity among women's experiences with special attention to the meanings of body image, sexuality, and race/ethnicity. The course also examines institutions in U.S. society that exert social control over women's bodies, especially the media, the legal system, and the medical professions.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

Black Studies/WGST 2003 - Topics: Black Coupling and Families
Scott Brooks
TR 9:30-10:45am
Middlebush 304

This course examines constructions of Black American identity, and therefore, gender, race, sexuality, and class in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Blackness has been and continues to be reconstructed via marriage, dating, and other forms of coupling. Emphasis will be placed on the role of socialization, institutions, mass media, myth, and individual and group practices. Students will have the opportunity to explore their own socialization and personal construction through assigned readings, self-reflection, experiential activities, and small group presentations.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST 2010 - Gender and Identity: Understanding Intersectionality
Zakiya Adair
MW 12:00-1:15pm | Tate Hall 110

This intermediate level course will explore the historical and contemporary dimensions of social inequality centered in gender, race, class and sexuality. Using an interdisciplinary lens and feminist analysis this course will analyze social, cultural, political and economic experiences of various individuals and communities. Additionally the course will explore feminist theories of intersectionality and power. Readings, lectures, films and discussions will focus on diverse structures of power and inequality and their relationship to constructions of patriarchy, capitalism, heterosexism, racism, nationality, and ability. Emphasis will be placed on the socially constructed definitions of various groups and how these definitions affect individual and group experiences.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 2080 - Perspectives on Sexual and Gender Diversity
Elisa Glick
MW 11:00am-12:15pm | Switzler Hall 001

Semester theme: Gender Freedom
What is gender and how do we define its boundaries? How are "male" and "female" bodies and identities produced by culture? How do societies that recognize a "third gender" or "third sex" challenge dominant ideas about the relations between sex, gender, and sexuality? What does gender freedom look like? These are a few of the questions we will explore in this cross-cultural course on gender and sexual diversity. Investigating the roles of race/ethnicity, class, region and sexuality in modern constructions of sexed bodies, we will study the diverse lives of gender variant people including how they have been represented—and how they have represented themselves—in literature and film. Throughout the course, we will pay particular attention to those systems of gender-based oppression that suppress multiple gender identities and expressions. Readings and other course materials are interdisciplinary, including anthropological and historical perspectives, gender theory, literary texts, and documentary films.

Satisfies Humanities General Education Requirement

WGST 2250 - Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class and Sexuality in the Americas
Rebecca Martínez
TR 11:00am-12:15pm | Switzler Hall 101

Semester theme: Latinas in the U.S.
This course provides an introduction to the formation of Chicana and Latina identities in the U.S. We will take a feminist perspective as we explore the historical formation of these identities. In other words, we will take on gender as one of the central themes for understanding the social location of Chicana/Latinas. Chicana feminism has carved out a space for Chicanas and other women of color, a space where they can articulate their experiences at the intersection of race, class, gender, sexuality, among other considerations. Some of the areas covered are: immigration, transnational identity, popular cultural, literary expression, body image, spirituality, racism/sexism, assimilation, acculturation, and activism. Note: This course is writing intensive.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST 2340 - Perspectives on Gender and Popular Culture (online)
Evelyn Somers Rogers
Arranged (Online Course: Mizzou Online/Self Paced)

Semester theme: Women in Popular Culture
This online, themes-based course explores issues in popular culture in the 20th and 21st centuries with respect to feminism, gender, sexuality, race, class, and ability. Students keep a pop-culture journal to increase their awareness of how women are represented in television, movies, music, advertising, news media, women's magazines, popular literature, and social media. Some areas we will cover include: how portrayals of working women in entertainment media do or don't coincide with the reality of women in the labor force; representations of poverty and social class; sex in advertising; and the bias against women's genres ("chick lit" and "chick flicks.") Course texts include Feminsm and Pop Culture by Andi Zeisler and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. There are several required films, as well as recommended TV episodes, websites, news stories, songs, magazines and more.

Satisfies Humanities General Education Requirement

WGST/History 2400 - Social History of U.S. Women
Michelle Morris
TR 11:00am-12:15pm | Strickland Hall 316

This course introduces students to the history of US women from the colonial period to the present. Lectures and readings will juxtapose the lives of individual women with larger cultural, scientific, and legal/political trends which helped to shape women's lives. Although many aspects of women's experiences are often assumed to be trans-historical, even the most seemingly essential do have a history. Students will explore the changing conceptions of what it means to be female as well as how understandings of female roles—e.g. mother, wife, domestic worker—have changed over the past four hundred years. Students will also explore American's women's history in its more traditional legal and political contexts. Although this course will cover many events included in more conventional American history courses, students may find that seemingly familiar events and documents, from the American Revolution and the writing of the US Constitution to the counter-cultural movements of the twentieth century and beyond, look different when seen through the eyes of America's women.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 2960 - Sexual Health Advocacy and Service Learning
Heather Eastman-Mueller
TR 2:00-3:15pm | Strickland Hall 117

The course will offer the student an opportunity to critically investigate sexuality as it exists within a cultural context including religion, politics, gender analysis, social justice, familial, and societal influences. Through assigned readings, reflection, experiential activities, and small group presentations, students will increase their awareness of sexual health issues, enhance self awareness and learn how to effectively educate their peers surrounding issues of sexual health.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST/English 3180 - Historical Survey of Women Writers
Aliki Barnstone
TR 12:30-1:45am | Respect Residence Hall 105
with film screenings W 7:00-9:30pm | Tate Hall 111

DESCRIPTION PENDING

Satisfies Humanities General Education Requirement

WGST 3260 - Themes in Gender, Law and Justice (online)
Andria Zylstra
Arranged (Online Course: Mizzou Online/Off Campus)

Semester theme: The Legal Rights of U.S. Women
This course explores the American legal system, focusing on the constitutional and legal rights of U.S. women. The course examines the relationship between women and the law, looking at the way women have been defined as legal subjects over time. Topics include women's struggle for constitutional equality, employment discrimination, marriage and divorce law, reproductive issues, and the criminal justice system. The course also addresses the role of women in the legal profession and feminist jurisprudence.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST/Sociology 3300 - Queer Theories/Identities
Wayne Brekhus
TR 3:30-4:45pm | Middlebush Hall 12

Queer theories have become increasingly influential in the behavioral sciences, social sciences and humanities. Like feminist and critical race theories, queer theories have begun to enter the canon and to become essential literacies within several disciplines, including sociology. Similarly lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (lgbtq) identities and standpoints have become increasingly important to the discipline of sociology. In this course we examine the development of queer theories, discuss the controversies and debates within and about these theories, and analyze identity issues related to the broad rubric of social categories related to queer theories and identities.The first section of this course outlines trends in gender and queer analyses, paying particular attention to queer theoretical challenges to essentialist identities and categories. After examining queer theoretical traditions related to gender presentation and transgender and exploring institutionalized heterosexuality and the policing of gender, we then examine empirical works on gay male, lesbian, bisexual, and queer identities. These empirical works are either central to, informed by, or present complications and challenges to queer theoretical traditions.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST/Sociology 3320 - Sociology of Gender
Staff
TR 11:00am-12:15pm | Mumford Hall 133

Study of the ways in which femininities and masculinities are constructed in American society with particular attention to gender ideologies and the gendered nature of the social structure. Prerequisite: Sociology 1000, 1360, or equivalent. WGST 1120 is considered an equivalent.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST 3450 - Feminist Methodologies
Srirupa Prasad
TR 12:30-1:45pm | Tate Hall 101

A feminist methodology can be described as the application of feminist theory to the techniques and concepts indispensable for any intellectual investigation. The issue we will investigate is the way/s that a feminist standpoint can make a difference in doing research. The course, which is organized as a lecture-seminar, aims at critically investigating different aspects of the relationship between feminism and processes of knowledge production. Feminist methodologies take a critical and revisionist stance towards existing research methods, be it in the humanities or the social sciences.

The primary question to be examined is what it means for research to be feminist. This debate is an ongoing one and we will further it through our class discussions. Attention to the responsibilities, rights and particular knowledge of those studied and recognition of gendered power relationships in the conduct and process of research are essential components of feminist research methodologies. Another important aspect is redefining traditional categories and disciplinary concepts through its attention to gender and other social categories as race, class, culture, sexuality, age, and nation among others. We will examine a range of approaches within feminist scholarship, where the goal is to enable students to identify the research tools and strategies suited to questions they want to pursue.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 3480/English 3119 - Themes in Sexuality and Literature
Elisa Glick
MW 4:00-5:15pm | Middlebush Hall 309

Semester theme: Bad Girls
Femme fatales. Vamps. Gender outlaws. Diabolical divas. Gold diggers. Feminists. Bohemian artists. Killer lesbians. Bitches. Fierce Rappers. Mean Girls. This course investigates American culture's obsessive, love-hate relationship with one of the most enigmatic and controversial images of modern womanhood: the "bad girl." Why have bad girls provoked such ambivalent feelings in the modern imagination, remaining objects of fascination and repulsion throughout the 20th century and into the 21st? Why does the image of the bad girl—sometimes beguiling, sometimes sinister—captivate and shock us today? How have women appropriated stereotypes of female deviance to rebel against gender constraints? Examining changing representations of bad girls and the social contexts they variously reflect and illuminate, this course investigates how differences of race, class, and sexuality have shaped cultural norms of femininity since the 1940s. Throughout the course, our aim will be to examine the ways in which the bad girl is indispensable to modern constructions of gender and desire in American culture. Readings and other course materials will include literary texts, films, theoretical and historical essays, and popular culture.

Satisfies Humanities General Education Requirement

WGST 3560 - Themes in Gender and Immigration
Rebecca Martínez
TR 3:00-4:15pm | Arts & Science Building 236

Semester theme: Documenting Current Controversies in Mexican/U.S. Immigration
This course will explore current controversies in Mexican-U.S. immigration primarily through the use of documentary film. We will cover a number of topics, including, but not limited to: nationalism and citizenship, national identity, identity and fluidity, social inequality, cultural citizenship, border theory, border politics and surveillance, the politics of nativism, and popular cultural images and representations of Mexican/Latino immigrants. We will analyze social constructions of the "us/them" dichotomy that pervades popular understandings of Mexican-U.S. immigration. We will explore these current controversies and the process of "othering" primarily through analysis of various discourses of difference and pay particular attention to issues of race, gender, sexuality, and social class.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST/History 3570 - European Women in the 19th Century
Linda Reeder
TR 9:30-10:45am | Arts & Science Building 236

This course will trace the history of European women from 1789 to 1900 exploring the ways women experienced the political, social, and economic transformations of the 19th century. We will look at how the French revolution, industrialization, class-formation, and colonialism redefined the lives of European women. Themes emphasized in this course include changes in family structure, work and gender-politics through the last century.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 3850 - Themes in Gender and the Politics of Representation
Julie Passanante Elman
MW 2:00-3:15pm | Hill Hall 201

Semester theme: Feminist Media Studies
This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media focusing on the second half of the twentieth century to the present. The media plays a major role not only in constructing gender norms but also in establishing "popular" or "appropriate" modes of gendered behavior, which, in turn affect the ways we communicate with one another. Using theories from cultural studies, film and gender studies, and queer theory, we will explore different processes and practices of gender and sexuality, specifically in terms of how the media represents and constructs norms of masculinity, femininity, gay, and straight. We will trace the history of feminist and queer critiques of media in relation to the history of television, film, and new media to gain insight into the ways that gender intersects with race, class, sexuality, and dis/ability. In so doing, we will explore the sociocultural forces that shape our individual and collective ideas about identity—the implicit and explicit ways in which culture "teaches" us what it means to be male or female. By considering cultural myths about gender alongside cultural debates about the social construction of gender, we will use feminist media studies as an analytical tool to consider how gender is entwined with notions of power, identity, and perspective, and we will consider media critique as a significant form of feminist political activism.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 3960 - Strategies for Effective Peer Education
Heather Eastman-Mueller
M 3:00-3:50pm | Arts & Science Building 101

This course adopts the "students helping students" model of learning. Through education, experiential practice, skill building and reflection, students will improve their understanding of their own learning preferences as well as how to develop and conduct effective presentations. Emphasis will be placed on adapting the content to various topics target audiences, building a safe space for learning, and managing disruptive behavior in a classroom setting. This course is the second part of a two-part series that trains qualified students to assist their peers in effectively managing and negotiating health decisions as they matriculate through their academic career.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 4020/7020 - Studies in Feminist Thought
Zakiya Adair
MW 3:00-4:15pm | Middlebush Hall 310

Semester theme: Black Feminist Thought
This seminar will explore the foundations and core themes in black feminism within the African Diaspora with a particular focus on the United States. The seminar will provide students with a comprehensive examination of major historical and contemporary contributions of black feminist working from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will uncover categories of analysis and practices of black feminism. Additionally we will identify how black feminist address social structures such as, racism, sexism, classism, ablelism and sexism. Through readings, films, in-class discussions, and analytical writing students will develop a comprehensive knowledge of black feminist thought.

Undergraduates: Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST/Social Work 4400/7400 - Contemporary Issues in Domestic Violence
Jennifer Carter Dochler
M 6:00-8:50pm | Middlebush Hall 211

This course covers the history of the battered women's movement, violence theories, policy issues, prevention and intervention practice models for working with battered women, their children, and abusers. Contemporary issues such as teen dating violence, universal screening, healthcare issues, workplace violence and coordinated community approaches will be examined.

Undergraduates: Elective Course: No General Education Credit

WGST/Sociology/Peace Studies 4550/7550 - Gender and Human Rights in Cross Cultural Perspective
Tola Pearce
MWF 2:00-2:50pm | Physics Building 120

In 1948, the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Since then, an increasing number of situations are being framed in terms of human rights. Gender issues were catapulted to the forefront of the global stage when in 1995 the UN reframed women's rights as human rights. Human right has remained interdisciplinary attracting scholars and activists from a wide range of disciplines who work on eliminating gender-based discrimination and who emphasize intersectionality. This course will focus on the global discourse on human rights emphasizing the competing ideas and theories developed within both Western and nonwestern perspectives. Although anchored in the Social Sciences, concepts from other disciplines such as history, philosophy and medicine will be used to examine a number of issues. Particular attention will be paid to the following issues: 1) the meaning of rights; 2) comparative perspectives on what constitutes human rights ; 3) feminist contributions to the human rights discourse; 4) some major dialogues including universalism vs. cultural relativism, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 'generation' rights; 5) gender and human rights situations (e.g. violence, sexuality, citizenship, health); 6) activism and solutions for human rights abuses. Note: This course is writing intensive for undergraduates.

Undergraduates: Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST/English 4780/7780 - Women's Folklore and Feminist Theory
Elaine J. Lawless
MWF 12:00-12:05am | Arts & Science Building 301

This course focuses on many diverse genres of women's verbal art, craft, and ritual in a variety of cultural settings. Folklore is the study of traditional practices that are both historic and contemporary—such as the tradition of women keeping a home altar, making quilts, telling family stories, keeping family traditions, testifying in church, singing, etc. The scholarly readings for the course will be made available on Blackboard, where students will also respond to each of the readings. This course includes a mandatory fieldwork assignment in which each student interviews a woman (or group of women) who maintains a female tradition.The final paper is a scholarly analysis of the tradition and how the women in the group talking about the meaning of this tradition. Intended for Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students. One previous folklore course will be a real asset for the students but is not a requirement.

We will read portions of the following texts:

  • Hollis/Pershing/Young, Feminist Theory and the Study of Folklore
  • Radner, Feminist Messages: Coding in Women's Folk Culture
  • Kalcik/Jordan, Women's Folklore, Women's Culture
  • Morgan, Children of Strangers
  • Turner, Beautiful Necessity: The Art and Meaning of Women's Altars
  • Lawless, Women Escaping Violence

Undergraduates: Satisfies Humanities General Education Requirement

WGST 4874/7874 - Women's and Gender Studies Abroad - Social Science
Carolina Escudero
Time and Location arranged

Buenos Aires: Gender Perspectives in the South American Media
This course is a portion of the Missouri School of Journalism Argentina Internship Program in Buenos Aires. It is designed to provide students knowledge about the mass media and gender issues in Argentina and South America. It is divided into eight units and it serves as an introductory module to the study of gender perspectives and media in the region. We will examine the gender perspectives in media as social and cultural systems. The course will introduce students to basic concepts such as gender, sex, sexuality, and gender socialization in the region. The seminar will then go on to examine how gender concepts and behaviours shape and are shaped by larger social institutions including class divisions, ethnicity, media, advertising, economic systems, health, organizations and governments.

More information on the Buenos Aires Program >>

Undergraduates: Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 4940 - Internship in Women's and Gender Studies
Contact Joan Hermsen
Arranged

Directed professional experience in appropriate feminist related agency or organization. Prerequisite: junior standing; departmental consent. Graded on S/U basis only.

Elective Course: No General Education Credit

WGST 4965 - Special Readings in Women's and Gender Studies
Contact Mary Jo Neitz
Arranged

Directed independent readings for 1-3 credit hours in Women's and Gender Studies for highly qualified and motivated students. Topic selected in consultation with supervisory faculty member. Repeatable up to 6 hours. Consent of department required.

Elective Course: No General Education Credit

WGST 8040 - Seminar: Problems and Issues in Feminist Scholarship
Mary Jo Neitz and Trudy Lewis
W 3:00pm-5:30pm | Strickland Hall 325

This is the required seminar for the interdisciplinary graduate minor in Women's and Gender Studies. Through an examination of classic texts and the work of contemporary feminist scholars who employ a range of critical frameworks, this course focuses on contemporary debates and the significance of interdisciplinary thinking in feminist scholarship and creative work. We engage a broad range of theoretical and methodological approaches to feminist work. Consent of department required.

WGST 8965 - Problems in Women's and Gender Studies
Contact Mary Jo Neitz
Arranged

Directed individual study on selected topics for qualified graduate students. Plan of study subject to approval by supervising faculty. Consent of department required.

WGST/ELPA 9440 - Race, Gender, Ethnicity in Higher Education
Jeni Hart
W 4:00-6:45pm | Townsend Hall 115

This course is designed to focus on historical and current issues of race, gender, and ethnicity in colleges and universities. Issues faced by students, faculty, and staff will be included. Issues of access and equity will be explored, as will the salience of diversity in a higher education setting.

 


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phone: 573-882-2703 | general inquiries: wgst@missouri.edu | webmaster: eggerss@missouri.edu

Department of Women's and Gender Studies | College of Arts and Science | University of Missouri
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Last modified: 11-Mar-2014