Department of Women's and Gender Studies University of Missouri Department of Women's and Gender Studies

Next Semester Courses

Fall 2015

  • 1120 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
  • 1360 The Female Experience: Body, Identity, Culture
  • 2003 Topics in Women’s & Gender Studies
  • 2010 Gender and Identity: Understanding Intersectionality
  • 2250 Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class and Sexuality in the Americas
  • 2260 Perspectives on Mass Media: Constructions of Gender, Race, and Sexuality
  • 2340 Perspectives on Gender and Popular Culture (online)
  • 2960 Sexual Health Advocacy and Service Learning
  • 3180 Historical Survey of Women Writers
  • 3260 Themes in Gender, Law & Justice (Online)
  • 3300 Queer Theories/Identities
  • 3320 Sociology of Gender
  • 3450 Feminist Methodologies
  • 3960 Strategies for Effective Peer Education
  • 4400/7400 Contemporary Issues in Domestic Violence
  • 4420/7420 Studies in Gender, Culture, & Politics
  • 4550/7550 Gender & Human Rights in Cross Culture Perspective
  • 4873/4874/4875/7874 Women's and Gender Studies Abroad - Social Science
  • 4940 Internship in Women's and Gender Studies
  • 4965 Special Readings in Women's and Gender Studies
  • 8040 Seminar: Problems & Issues in Feminist Scholarship
  • 8965 Problems in Women's and Gender Studies
  • 9440 Race, Gender, Ethnicity in Higher Education

Descriptions

WGST 1120 - Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Julie Elman
MW 11:00 – 11:50am | Neff Hall 204

This class is designed to help you learn to think critically and analytically about the various ways that gender is socially constructed and how its construction has both social and cultural importance. We will pay particular attention to how race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and location structure the lived experiences that women face. In addition, we will delve into the ways in which these constructions and intersections shape women's lives. Another key area of this course's focus will be gender inequality. We will explore how women may endure similar struggles while engaging with the ways that differing social, political, economic, and cultural conditions create distinct differences among individuals.

As an interdisciplinary introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, in this class you will read and view a variety of texts: personal narratives, feminist theory, analytic essays, poems, stories, documentary films, TED lectures, and YouTube videos (to name a few). These texts will help you gain a comprehensive understanding of gender as a historical and socio-cultural construction, an introduction to concepts and issues emerging in the field of Women's and Gender Studies, and an understanding of contemporary debates taking place in feminist theory and scholarship.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 1360 - The Female Experience: Body, Identity, Culture
Staff
MWF 1:00-3:50pm | A&S Building 113

This course examines the ways individuals come to understand what it means to be a woman in U.S. culture. We explore the diversity among women's experiences with special attention to the meanings of body image, sexuality, and race/ethnicity. The course also examines institutions in U.S. society that exert social control over women's bodies, especially the media, the legal system, and the medical professions.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

Cross-listed with Sociology (SOCIOL 1360)

WGST 2003 – Topics in Women’s & Gender Studies
Zakiya Adair
TTh 12:30-1:45pm | A&S Building 310

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

Cross-listed with Black Studies (BL_STU 2303)

WGST 2010 - Gender and Identity: Understanding Intersectionality
Zakiya Adair
MW 12:00-1:15pm | Middlebush 210

This intermediate level course will explore the historical and contemporary dimensions of social inequality centered in gender, race, class and sexuality. Using an interdisciplinary lens and feminist analysis this course will analyze social, cultural, political and economic experiences of various individuals and communities. Additionally the course will explore feminist theories of intersectionality and power. Readings, lectures, films and discussions will focus on diverse structures of power and inequality and their relationship to constructions of patriarchy, capitalism, heterosexism, racism, nationality, and ability. Emphasis will be placed on the socially constructed definitions of various groups and how these definitions affect individual and group experiences.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 2250 - Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class and Sexuality in the Americas
Rebecca Martínez
TTh 11:00am - 12:15pm | Switzer 101

Semester theme: Latinas in the U.S.
This course provides an introduction to the formation of Chicana and Latina identities in the U.S. We will take a feminist perspective as we explore the historical formation of these identities. In other words, we will take on gender as one of the central themes for understanding the social location of Chicana/Latinas. Chicana feminism has carved out a space for Chicanas and other women of color, a space where they can articulate their experiences at the intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality, among other considerations. Some of the areas covered are: immigration, transnational identity, popular cultural, literary expression, body image, spirituality, racism/sexism, assimilation, acculturation, and activism. Note: This course is writing intensive.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST 2260 - Perspectives on Mass Media: Constructions of Gender, Race, and Sexuality
Zakiya Adair
MW 2:00 – 3:15pm | Tate 101

Semester theme: From Amos and Andy to Youtube
This course examines historical and contemporary constructions of gender, race, class and sexuality in the U. S. media in the 20th and 21st centuries. Emphasis will be placed on mass media’s coverage, practices and uses of various socially constructed identities. In this course we will examine the historical relationship between media (television, major newspapers and magazines, radio, internet and social networks) and representations of underrepresented and marginalized groups. This course will also explore the global economic forces that influenced these representations. The first half of the course will be devoted to developing critical media theory and understanding the history of mass media. The second half of this course will examine various autonomous cultural creations and uses of mass media by marginalized groups to subvert dominant stereotypes.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 2340 - Perspectives on Gender and Popular Culture (online)
Evelyn Rogers
Arranged (Online SP 9 Months)

Semester theme: Women in Popular Culture
This online, themes-based course explores issues in popular culture in the 20th and 21st centuries with respect to feminism, gender, sexuality, race, class, and ability. Students keep a pop-culture journal to increase their awareness of how women are represented in television, movies, music, advertising, news media, women's magazines, popular literature, and social media. Some areas we will cover include: how portrayals of working women in entertainment media do or don't coincide with the reality of women in the labor force; representations of poverty and social class; sex in advertising; and the bias against women's genres ("chick lit" and "chick flicks.") Course texts include Feminism and Pop Culture by Andi Zeisler and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. There are several required films, as well as recommended TV episodes, websites, news stories, songs, magazines and more.

Satisfies Humanities General Education Requirement

WGST 2960 - Sexual Health Advocacy and Service Learning
Heather Eastman-Mueller
TTh 2:00-3:15pm | Strickland Hall 117

The course will offer the student an opportunity to critically investigate sexuality, as it exists within a cultural context including religion, politics, gender analysis, social justice, familial, and societal influences. Through assigned readings, reflection, experiential activities, and small group presentations, students will increase their awareness of sexual health issues, enhance self awareness and learn how to effectively educate their peers surrounding issues of sexual health.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 3180 – Historical Survey of Women Writers
Aliki Barnstone
TTh 12:30 – 1:45pm with screenings T 7:00 – 9:00pm | Tate 110

This writing intensive historical survey of women writers will explore poetry, fiction, non-fiction prose, theory, and film by or about women, whose theme is "Women Finding their Voices: Gender, Diversity, and Influence." We will consider the prohibitions against women’s self-expression and artistic expression. As we read and view films, we will collectively develop a vocabulary for discussing the ways in which women deal with gender in their art, as well as the ways that women writers, visual artists, and filmmakers are influenced, emboldened, and empowered by their foremothers.

Satisfies Humanities General Education Requirement

Cross-listed with English (ENGLSH 3180)

WGST 3260 – Themes in Gender, Law & Justice (Online)
Alexandria Zylstra
Arranged (Mizzou Online Semester Based)

Semester theme: The Legal Rights of U.S. Women
This course explores the American legal system, focusing on the constitutional and legal rights of women.  Topics include women’s struggle for constitutional equality, employment discrimination, marriage and divorce, reproductive issues, and women and education.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST 3300 - Queer Theories/Identities
Staff
TTh 2:00 – 3:15pm | Strickland 105

Queer theories have become increasingly influential in the behavioral sciences, social sciences and humanities. Like feminist and critical race theories, queer theories have begun to enter the canon and to become essential literacies within several disciplines, including sociology. Similarly lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) identities and standpoints have become increasingly important to the discipline of sociology. In this course we examine the development of queer theories, discuss the controversies and debates within and about these theories, and analyze identity issues related to the broad rubric of social categories related to queer theories and identities. The first section of this course outlines trends in gender and queer analyses, paying particular attention to queer theoretical challenges to essentialist identities and categories. After examining queer theoretical traditions related to gender presentation and transgender and exploring institutionalized heterosexuality and the policing of gender, we then examine empirical works on gay male, lesbian, bisexual, and queer identities. These empirical works are either central to, informed by, or present complications and challenges to queer theoretical traditions.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

Cross-listed with Sociology (SOCIOL 3300)

WGST 3320 - Sociology of Gender
Staff
TTh 11:00am-12:15pm | Strickland 105

Study of the ways in which femininities and masculinities are constructed in American society with particular attention to gender ideologies and the gendered nature of the social structure. Prerequisite: Sociology 1000, 1360, or equivalent. WGST 1120 is considered an equivalent.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

Cross-listed with Sociology (SOCIOL 3320)

WGST 3450 – Feminist Methodologies
Srirupa Prasad
TTh 2:00 – 3:15pm | Tate 101

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST 3960 - Strategies for Effective Peer Education
Heather Eastman-Mueller
M 3:00-3:50pm | A&S 101

This course adopts the "students helping students" model of learning. Through education, experiential practice, skill building and reflection, students will improve their understanding of their own learning preferences as well as how to develop and conduct effective presentations. Emphasis will be placed on adapting the content to various topics target audiences, building a safe space for learning, and managing disruptive behavior in a classroom setting. This course is the second part of a two-part series that trains qualified students to assist their peers in effectively managing and negotiating health decisions as they matriculate through their academic career.

Satisfies Social Science General Education Requirement

WGST 4400/7400 – Contemporary Issues in Domestic Violence
Staff
M 6:00 – 8:50pm | Middlebush 211

This course covers the history of the violence against women movement, domestic violence theories, policy issues, prevention and intervention practice models for working with victims of intimate partner violence, their children, and abusers. Contemporary issues such as current laws, trauma-informed care, universal screening, voluntary services, and coordinated community approaches will be examined.

Cross-listed with Social Work (SOC_WK 4400/7400)

WGST 4420/7420 – Studies in Gender, Culture, & Politics
Julie Elman
MW 2:00 – 3:15pm | A&S 202

Semester theme: Queer Cultural Politics
Queer scholarship places the cultural poli/cs of sex, pleasure, and desire at the center of its analy/cal frame. This combined graduate/undergraduate seminar, “Queer Cultural Poli/cs,” will analyze the entwined histories of queer ac/vism, poli/cs, pleasure and representa/on. Among the topics we might explore include the development of queer publics, the emo/onal economies of popular culture, the intersec/ons of racial, gender, disability and sexual iden/ty in popular culture, the an/-social turn in queer theory, crip/queer theory, and queer temporali/es. Throughout the course, we will pair key theore/cal texts in queer theory and use them as a lens through which to cri/que cultural texts, including film, television, popular fic/on, music, and digital media. In this course, we will embrace queer as a rigorous, dissident cri/cal prac/ce and crea/ve mode of cultural produc/on.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST 4550/7550 – Gender & Human Rights in Cross Culture Perspective
Tola Pearce
MWF 2:00 – 2:50pm | Physics 102

In 1948, the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Since then, an increasing number of situations are being framed in terms of human rights. Gender issues were catapulted to the forefront of the global stage when in 1995 the UN reframed women’s rights as human rights. Human right has remained interdisciplinary attracting scholars and activists from a wide range of disciplines who work on eliminating gender-based discrimination and who emphasize intersectionality. This course will focus on the global discourse on human rights emphasizing the competing ideas and theories developed within both Western and nonwestern perspectives. Although anchored in the Social Sciences, concepts from other disciplines such as history, philosophy and medicine will be used to examine a number of issues. Particular attention will be paid to the following issues: 1) the meaning of rights; 2) the role of the United nations 3) comparative perspectives on what constitutes human rights; 4) feminist contributions to the human rights discourse; 5) some major dialogues including universalism vs. cultural relativism, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, ‘generation’ rights; 6) gender and human rights situations (e.g. Trafficking, violence, sexuality, health); 7) activism and solutions for human rights abuses.

Satisfies Behavioral Science General Education Requirement

WGST 4873/4874/4875/7874 - Women's and Gender Studies Abroad - Social Science
Carolina Escudero
Time and Location arranged

Barcelona:

WGST 4940 - Internship in Women's and Gender Studies
Contact Joan Hermsen
Arranged

Directed professional experience in appropriate feminist related agency or organization. Prerequisite: junior standing; departmental consent. Graded on S/U basis only.

Elective Course: No General Education Credit

WGST 4965 - Special Readings in Women's and Gender Studies
Contact Joan Hermsen
Arranged

Directed independent readings for 1-3 credit hours in Women's and Gender Studies for highly qualified and motivated students. Topic selected in consultation with supervisory faculty member. Repeatable up to 6 hours. Consent of department required.

Elective Course: No General Education Credit

WGST 8040 – Seminar: Problems & Issues in Feminist Scholarship
Trudy Lewis & Mary Jo Neitz
T 1:00 – 3:00pm | Strickland 326G

This is one of two required seminars for the interdisciplinary graduate minor in Women's and Gender Studies. We examine a selection classic texts and as well as creative writers and contemporary feminist scholars who employ a range of critical frameworks. The course focuses on contemporary debates and the significance of interdisciplinary thinking in feminist scholarship. The goal is to expose students to a broad spectrum of theoretical and methodological approaches to feminist research. Consent of department required.

WGST 8965 - Problems in Women's and Gender Studies
Contact Joan Hermsen
Arranged

Directed individual study on selected topics for qualified graduate students. Plan of study subject to approval by supervising faculty. Consent of department required.

WGST 9440 – Race, Gender, Ethnicity in Higher Education
Amalia Dache-Gerbino
W 7:00 – 9:45pm | Townsend Hall 204

This course is designed to focus on theoretical, historical and current issues of race, gender, and ethnicity shaping colleges and universities. Issues faced by external and internal campus communities will be included. Issues of access and equity will be explored, as will the salience of critical multiculturalism within higher education.


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phone: 573-882-2703 | general inquiries: wgst@missouri.edu | webmaster: hortontj@missouri.edu

Department of Women's and Gender Studies | College of Arts and Science | University of Missouri
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Last modified: 15-Apr-2015